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7 goals to add to your recovery plan

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Recovery after a stroke isn’t just about the physical aspect of getting your strength and mobility back. Our minds are so powerful they can hold us back or push us forward, which is why you should include some of these goals in your recovery plan:

  • Be kind to yourself
    • You’ll have highs and lows, days where you feel a superhero and others where you just want to lay in bed. That’s OK — learn to be kind to yourself and listen to your body and mind. 
  • Practice gratitude
    • There’s always something to be grateful for. Make a conscious effort every week to name three things you are grateful for that week.
  • Spend 5 minutes a day doing nothing
    • Sit outside, or inside, on the floor or on a chair. Wherever you are, take 5 minutes a day to think and do nothing. Just be!
  • Get connected
    • Being part of a group can be very rewarding and have a positive impact on your mental wellbeing. Find an online support group, or create your own on Facebook, or sign up to volunteer at a local charity. 
  • Reward yourself
    • Whether it’s a chocolate bar or a pat on the back, you deserve it! If you’ve achieved something great, take the time to feel proud and reward your hard work.
  • Learn from the bad days
    • We all have them and we all should learn from them. At the end of a bad day, instead of dwelling on the negative ask yourself: “what can I do differently next time I have a day like this?” Switching the lens can help you refocus and re-energize for the next day.
  • Be proud of your progress
    • Think back to when you started and look at yourself now. Isn’t it incredible? You are the only one responsible for that progress; YOU made it happen. Be proud of yourself, your strength and your resilience to keep moving forward.

Recovery isn’t a straight, flat road; life isn’t either. Learning how to accept the good and bad, and learn from it, can go a long way in helping you during your recovery. Your mental and physical strength is measured by how much you’ve overcome through the years rather than how much you can do right now.

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